Exhibitions

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THE KING'S ROAD

This exhibition tells visitors about the construction and maintenance of the King's Road, commercial activities, posting stations and about who used it. We hope visitors will find the exhibition interesting and give them a sense of life in Valdres in the 1700s and 1800s. The exhibition opened in June 2018.

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NORWEGIAN ZITHERS

Seven Norwegian zithers from all around Norway, in a diversity of decorations comprising acanthus vines and carved lines, fish, foxes, dancers and church spires. The country's oldest stringed instrument is a 500-year-old zither from Vardal outside Gjøvik.

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COLORFUL COMMUNITY – WHITE RAGE. NATIONAL MANIFESTATIONS 1945–2018

This exhibition discusses the national "we" from 1945 up to the present day. What happens when an attempt is made to redefine the country's national community in post-war Norway? Who falls inside that definition and who does not? And what happens to the status of traditional cultural expressions when a nation's cultural policy begins to swing from diversity and globalism in the 2000s to a national-conservative values set over the past five years?

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BUNAD DOLL COLLECTION

The museum's doll collection consists of around 80 dolls dressed in national costumes (bunad). The collection was the life work of Tordis Røyne (1926–2006), a farmer's wife from Vestre Sidre, who during the course of her life made around 200 dolls. She cast the faces, made the wigs (often from real hair) and dressed the dolls in miniature versions of national costumes from all around Norway. She also had a small army of helpers: Grete Rudi Bråten, Gunhild Nørsterud and Berit Vidme helped with the sewing. Her husband, Rolf Tidemann Røyne, and later Johannes Grøthe, made the dolls' shoes. Silversmith Inger Norun Solhaug made most of the national costume jewellery, and even made spectacles from watch glass and silver spectacle frames. Miniature zithers and other tiny instruments made from wood also make up the collection.

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THE HISTORICAL BUILDINGS

The old buildings span a broad spectrum of Norwegian building traditions. Pre-industrial timber-frame buildings from the 1700s and 1800s make up the largest part of the collection. The design and details are signs of local craftsmanship traditions, but also reveal affinities with internationally inspired styles. These impulses were first expressed as details in panels, mouldings, supporting beams, decorative painting and glasswork.